The Eltham Society

Welcome to The Eltham Society website

The Tudor Barn, Eltham Founded in 1965 the society has flourished so that our membership is over 500. Many members are, of course, living in the catchment area of SE9 but others have moved to areas in the United Kingdom and abroad. We have town namesakes in Australia and New Zealand.

The society has an Executive Council of 17 members each contributing their own specialities, all elected at our Annual General Meeting held in March. There are three sub committees: Amenity, Social and Publications - all advancing the aims of the society.

The aims of the Society are enshrined in our motto: Preserving the past, Conserving the present, and Protecting the future.

The Newsletter is an integral part of The Eltham Society and has been published ever since the Society began in 1965. It is one of the benefits of membership and is published quarterly. It covers news of the Society's events and articles of local and wider interest.

But where is Eltham?

Eltham is approximately 10 miles south-east of London and the southernmost town in the Greenwich Borough. Mention of Eltham is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 and is strategically placed between London and Kent. Its proximity to the River Thames led to the establishment of a moated manor house, which soon became the home of Royalty, Eltham Palace. Since those early times Eltham has grown into an urban town and carries evidence of building throughout each architectural period. It still retains many open green spaces and therefore sits happily between town and country.

Eltham is centred on its High Street and extends to Mottingham and New Eltham to the south, Kidbrooke and Lee to the west, Avery Hill to the east, Well Hall and Shooters Hill to the north. Click here for a map showing where Eltham is.

The town sign, designed by local architect Paul Cookson, at the pedestrian area of Passey Place was financed and erected by the society in 1995. The sign shows famous landmarks around Eltham It was formally unveiled and handed to the borough for safe keeping on 3rd September 1995 by the then Chairman, Marion Kennett. In 2001 an Eltham Society Award was given to Groundwork for the pedestrian area, which was improved as a Millennium project. The sign was moved to a new position in Passey Place but is still a landmark and symbol of the society's commitment to Eltham.

Other evidence of the society's commitment to Eltham can be found at Well Hall Pleasaunce where a plaque stands on the site of an 18th century house (demolished in the 1930s), which at one time was occupied by the children's author, E. Nesbit. Many of her most famous books were written at Well Hall House such as The Railway Children, The Treasure Seekers and The Wouldbegoods.

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